If you’re a runner, you probably already know the many great health benefits you receive from participating in this great activity, but did you know that running can help prevent Alzheimer’s disease? Exercise is the best way to prevent this frightening illness.

A report that was released early this year warned that one out of every eight baby boomers, including those born from about the mid-1940s to the mid-1960s, will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. That equates to up to ten million boomers that can expect to develop the disease, for which there is no prevention or cure.

Those are scary statistics, but if you already participate in an exercise routine for at least 30 minutes three or four times per week, you’re well on your way to greatly lessening your risk of the devastating illness.

As many as 50% of Alzheimer’s cases can be prevented through lifestyle changes, including leading an active lifestyle rather than a sedentary one.

If you’re a runner, the chances are that you don’t have high blood pressure, aren’t obese, don’t smoke or have diabetes; all factors that can lead to the illness. In addition to reducing your risk of those negative aspects, the exercise itself has been proven to lower your risk. The   physical   activity appears to inhibit Alzheimer’s-like brain changes in mice, slowing the development of a key feature of the disease.

The director of the Alzheimer’s Research Centre at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Ronald Petersen remarked, “Regular physical exercise is probably the best means we have of preventing Alzheimer’s disease today, better than medications, better than intellectual activity, better than supplements and diet.”                                                                                  imagesCANPXC9T

While Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, it is not a normal part of aging. If you need another excuse to motivate yourself to get into the good habit of running, or any type of aerobic activity consistently, this is a good one.

Alzheimer`s is a fatal brain disease and a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, behaviour and thinking that gradually worsen over time. Eventually people with the illness completely lose their independence. Early symptoms can include memory loss, difficulty solving problems, inability or difficulty completing simple tasks, confusion as to the date and/or time, trouble interpreting distances or problems with reading, communication difficulties, losing things, poor judgment or a decrease in judgment, withdrawing from involvement in social or work activities, and changes in mood.

It’s not a disease anyone should want to wish even on their worst enemy.

If you’ve been living on your sofa or at the keyboard far too much lately, it’s time to get up and get active. During my time working on fall prevention I have met some wonderful people who have lived some fantastic and intriguing lives, intelligent people, people who have contributed to society, people who have invented or entertained us, so many lives lost and life times of memories forgotten and only a shell of that once person left behind,

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I do believe that it is NEVER TOO LATE TO START AND BECOME MORE ACTIVE

 

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About maturemovers

Exercise Specialist ~ Sports Therapist

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